Category Archives: Science fiction

OMG GUESS WHAT TIME IT IS

Well, as I write this, my computer clock says it’s 11:48 PM, which isn’t of any special significance EXCEPT that it means that Line and Orbit’s day-of-release is minutes away (!!!!!!).

IT ALSO MEANS that there are now just about 24 hours left to enter to win a free copy. DO IT

I swear, I’d be dancing if I wasn’t so tired and if I didn’t have to teach at 8 AM.

More fiction-themed bloggy stream-crossing

Just because once again it seems pertinent; my academic alter-ego has been blogging more over at Cyborgology about fiction and why it matters, even to people who do ostensibly non-fictional work.

Fictive writing doesn’t just allow us a deeper understanding of our past but a richer window into our present and a more vital imagining of our future. As I’ll argue extensively to anyone who has the misfortune to raise the topic with me (I am so much fun at parties), far from being merely escapism, fiction – especially speculative fiction – is a fantastically useful arena in which to do social theory, yet it’s one that most social scientists roundly ignore…Speculative fiction, among other genres, allows us to explore the full implications of our relationship with technology, of the arrangement of society, of who we are as human beings and who we might become as more-than-human creatures. It’s useful not because it’s expected to rigidly adhere to the plausible but because it’s liberated from doing exactly that: it’s free to take what-if as far as it can go.

Perhaps I don’t need to keep making this argument, given that whenever I do it seems like there’s a chorus of people who soundly agree with me. Then again, I get the sense that there’s a sizable block of older-generation sociologists who still think the internet might be kind of a passing, unimportant thing, so there you go.

Yet another reminder: 22 DAYS TO GET FREE STUFF

I promise to keep my yelling about this to a minimum, but I want to once again yawp about how I’m giving away a bunch of Line and Orbit crap RIGHT HERE.

Entering is easy and even fun if you like comment forms and I promise to use your contact info only to send you periodic updates about what polish I’m doing my nails with today.

Publisher’s Weekly gives me a Christmas present

I’ve already posted about this in a few places, but what the hell, might as well put it here too:

LineandOrbitSo I’m sitting on the couch in my parents’ house on Christmas Day evening, watching The West Wing with my brother and sister and dad and surfing around on my laptop, and I see that Publisher’s Weekly has reviewed Line and Orbit. Instant. Anxiety. omg what if they hated it

They didn’t.

Moraine (In the Pale Moonlight) and debut author Soem collaborate on a deliciously fulfilling gay sci-fi romance…Readers will fall for the engaging dialogue, wonderfully fleshed-out characters, a sexy and realistic romance, fully realized world-building, and a genuinely interesting science fictional core issue to work through. This phenomenal novel marks Moraine and Soem as authors to watch.

So Merry effing Christmas to me, basically.

Not every review is post-worthy, clearly, but this is the first starred review I’ve ever gotten from PW, and it’s my first novel, so yeah, I’m a little chuffed. Hopefully others like it as much.

Fantastic Erotica – “dangerous”

Charlie Jane Anders over at io9 has reviewed Circlet Press’s Fantastic Eroticafantasic_erotica_cover_comp_400x600which includes my SF short “Catch and Release” – and calls it “[possibly] the year’s most dangerous science fiction anthology”. Which is awesome.

So why do I say the stories in Fantastic Erotica are dangerous? It’s not because they feature anything nonconsensual or especially squicky — although sex with a Lovecraftian horror might just weird some people out, I suppose. Nor is it because there’s quite a lot of non-heteronormative sex in here — you’re a grown-up, you can handle that. It’s more that these stories feature authentic characters who are changed and shaped by some weird and outlandish sexual experiences. They struggle with how much control to give up, and how much of their constructed selves to let go of. They discover that much of what they were taught about the world is false or incomplete. Through really hot sex.

Again, Fantastic Erotica is available here in ebook and print editions. Give awesome porn for Christmas!

The “Next Big Thing” Blog Hop

So I’ve been tagged in the Next Big Thing blog hop that’s been going around, by the marvelous Catherine Lundoff – who you should really be paying attention to. I just finished her novel Silver Moon and enjoyed it hugely (menopausal werewolves; you can’t imagine what a breath of fresh air that is).

So here’s me.

Continue reading

Stop saying ‘fabulous’ in there.

Back from Philcon. It was, in a word, fabulous. I made fabulous friends. I went to some fabulous panels (including one that was actually awful in a fairly fabulous way). I had fabulous Indian food. I met Catherynne Valente and she was fabulously gracious and remembered the essay I wrote about Silently and Very Fast and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. So yeah. Fabulously fabulicious.

by Katie Rose Pipkin

Here are a couple other fabulous things:

  • My short work of SF eco-horror, “Invasives”, is up to read for free in the current issue of The Journal of Unlikely Entomology. It has some awesome art. For those who care about such things, it came from an experience I had as a child camping with my father, where the trees around the campground were covered in disgusting gray caterpillars and I refused to go near them because I think on some level I was afraid they were going to leap on me. Childhood trauma for the literary win.
  • The Scheherazade’s Facade giveaway is still technically going on here, but I decided that Tumblr might be a slightly better tool for this, so you can also enter to win there by simply reblogging. Same terms: I choose a winner at random this upcoming Friday. Goooooo.