Category Archives: Science fiction

Publisher’s Weekly gives me a Christmas present

I’ve already posted about this in a few places, but what the hell, might as well put it here too:

LineandOrbitSo I’m sitting on the couch in my parents’ house on Christmas Day evening, watching The West Wing with my brother and sister and dad and surfing around on my laptop, and I see that Publisher’s Weekly has reviewed Line and Orbit. Instant. Anxiety. omg what if they hated it

They didn’t.

Moraine (In the Pale Moonlight) and debut author Soem collaborate on a deliciously fulfilling gay sci-fi romance…Readers will fall for the engaging dialogue, wonderfully fleshed-out characters, a sexy and realistic romance, fully realized world-building, and a genuinely interesting science fictional core issue to work through. This phenomenal novel marks Moraine and Soem as authors to watch.

So Merry effing Christmas to me, basically.

Not every review is post-worthy, clearly, but this is the first starred review I’ve ever gotten from PW, and it’s my first novel, so yeah, I’m a little chuffed. Hopefully others like it as much.

Fantastic Erotica – “dangerous”

Charlie Jane Anders over at io9 has reviewed Circlet Press’s Fantastic Eroticafantasic_erotica_cover_comp_400x600which includes my SF short “Catch and Release” – and calls it “[possibly] the year’s most dangerous science fiction anthology”. Which is awesome.

So why do I say the stories in Fantastic Erotica are dangerous? It’s not because they feature anything nonconsensual or especially squicky — although sex with a Lovecraftian horror might just weird some people out, I suppose. Nor is it because there’s quite a lot of non-heteronormative sex in here — you’re a grown-up, you can handle that. It’s more that these stories feature authentic characters who are changed and shaped by some weird and outlandish sexual experiences. They struggle with how much control to give up, and how much of their constructed selves to let go of. They discover that much of what they were taught about the world is false or incomplete. Through really hot sex.

Again, Fantastic Erotica is available here in ebook and print editions. Give awesome porn for Christmas!

The “Next Big Thing” Blog Hop

So I’ve been tagged in the Next Big Thing blog hop that’s been going around, by the marvelous Catherine Lundoff – who you should really be paying attention to. I just finished her novel Silver Moon and enjoyed it hugely (menopausal werewolves; you can’t imagine what a breath of fresh air that is).

So here’s me.

Continue reading

Stop saying ‘fabulous’ in there.

Back from Philcon. It was, in a word, fabulous. I made fabulous friends. I went to some fabulous panels (including one that was actually awful in a fairly fabulous way). I had fabulous Indian food. I met Catherynne Valente and she was fabulously gracious and remembered the essay I wrote about Silently and Very Fast and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. So yeah. Fabulously fabulicious.

by Katie Rose Pipkin

Here are a couple other fabulous things:

  • My short work of SF eco-horror, “Invasives”, is up to read for free in the current issue of The Journal of Unlikely Entomology. It has some awesome art. For those who care about such things, it came from an experience I had as a child camping with my father, where the trees around the campground were covered in disgusting gray caterpillars and I refused to go near them because I think on some level I was afraid they were going to leap on me. Childhood trauma for the literary win.
  • The Scheherazade’s Facade giveaway is still technically going on here, but I decided that Tumblr might be a slightly better tool for this, so you can also enter to win there by simply reblogging. Same terms: I choose a winner at random this upcoming Friday. Goooooo.

Line and Orbit: The Cast

This is the third of a series of posts that I’ve been doing to introduce the world of Line and Orbit and the people who inhabit it (if you missed any of the previous stuff, they’re all linked here).

This time I want to dig in to the characters themselves – our primary cast, at least. For this I decided I wanted to do it in I Surrender style. Normally I honestly wouldn’t be so into this, because I’m really about letting readers imagine characters however they want to with the few details we give them. However, it was fun, and, like I said, I think it’s a good way to introduce them.

So.

Continue reading

Line and Orbit: Oh, the places you’ll go

This is the second part of a series of posts I’m doing on the worldbuilding side of Line and Orbit, since the worldbuilding is something that my co-author and I worked especially hard on – though of course, we worked hard on everything. Last time I posted about the different factions featured in the book. This time: A guided tour of Line and Orbit.

Continue reading

Heiresses of Russ 2012: on sale and reviewed!

This is an awesome week for writerly things. First, Heiresses of Russ 2012 is now on sale and it’s awesome. Second, Brit Mandelo has reviewed it over at Tor.com and gives my story a nice little nod:

Sunny Moraine’s “The Thick Night” is a complicated attempt at exploring cultural clashes between the offering of aid and the folks who receive it in rural Africa, while also dealing with the strength and resilience of the protagonist, Mkali, as she survives the murder of her parents to raise her younger siblings, doing what she must because there’s no other choice. Her unexpected romance with the android that she has been given by the American aid workers is tender, but also immensely ethically complicated. Moraine never lets the reader forget that there are elements of slavery or the impossibility of knowing what is “real” for Madini, the android. It’s an ambitious piece dealing with difficult topics in what seems, to my eyes, a respectful way.

Check out the full review. Also check out the whole book. Seriously, it’s awesome. The lineup includes Lisa Nohealani Morton, Nalo Hopkinson, Amal El-Mohtar, An Owomoyela, and Laird Barron, among others.

Circlet’s Fantastic Erotica is out now and I’m in it


[ click to buy in ebook and print editions ]

To celebrate the 20th Anniversary of Circlet Press, Fantastic Erotica presents the very best erotic science fiction and fantasy short stories published by Circlet in the past five years. Chosen by popular vote by the readership from among all the stories published by Circlet from 2008 to the present, these favorites are the cream of the crop.

A winner and two runners-up were chosen. N.K. Jemisin’s “The Dancer’s War” shows us the sensuous magic not of a stock fantasy medieval Europe, but of an Africa that never was. Bernie Mojzes “Ink” combines H.P. Lovecraft and Raymond Chandler into a surprisingly soulful story of sexual transformation. And our winner, “Ota Discovers Fire,” by Vinnie Tesla pokes gentle fun at all the traipsing into exotic lands depicted in fantasy quests. Sometimes the traveler you meet on the road is nothing like what you expect.

Featuring stories by Frances Selkirk, Elizabeth Schechter, Kierstin Cherry, Angela Caperton, Sacchi Green, Kal Cobalt, Elizabeth Reeve, Kathleen Tudor, Monique Poirier, Sunny Moraine, Clarice Clique, Nobilis Reed, David Sklar, Michael M. Jones, David Hubbard, Shanna Germain, N.K. Jemisin, Bernie Mojzes, and Vinnie Tesla.

“The best of [these stories] fully integrate sex with SF/Fantasy and provide erotic heat… it’s imaginative and a cut above most such offerings.”
—Publishers Weekly

Continue reading

Line and Orbit – The Factions

Here’s the first of a series of posts introducing the world of Line and Orbit and the people who inhabit it – since I think I’ve actually talked very little about that. The worldbuilding in this book is one of the things that we’re most proud of, and I want to talk it up.

First up: A rundown of the various factions and species that show up in the book. Enjoy.


[Image by JazzLizard]

Continue reading

WIP Wednesday (sort of) – Harbinger: no longer a WIP

An earlier version of this post appeared on my Dreamwidth

So I finished Harbinger yesterday, or at least a draft of it. It clocks in at about 79k words, which is respectable. There’s still a lot of work to be done on it, but it feels good to be done.

I suppose. It honestly doesn’t feel like much of a big deal. Which is weird. It should. I’ve been working on it for nine months now. You guys it has literally been like I’ve been pregnant with a book.

And now it’s done–or at least a draft of it is–and I just feel tired. And disconnected from it. I wrote -end- at the bottom of the page around 1:30 and then went to eat lunch and didn’t really think about it all that much for the rest of the afternoon. Granted, I had the first lecture of the semester to deal with yesterday evening and that always makes me nervous and preoccupied but still. I realize that it’s kind of the height of callous assholery to be all like oh yawn I finished another novel but I honestly do feel a little like that.

And I look back on the other two books I wrote/co-wrote–Line and Orbit and Communion–and I think about the differences in the two. At the end of L&O I was fucking elated. I was almost dizzy with joy. I had also written about 10k words in a single day so I was just dizzy, period. And then at the end of Communion I was considerably less excited but it still felt like kind of a Thing. And now… yeah.

Maybe some of it is just that I have more visceral sense of how far from done a draft actually means–from being in publishable shape and then actually being published. It took us about two years to sell L&O, from completion to signing the contracts, and this was after it took a good year or so to write. And then there’s been the edits, which were extensive, and it still won’t even come out for another few months. And I still haven’t sold Communion. I’m sure I will but it might take a while longer.

And now there’s Harbinger. My third baby. I love it but it’s got some defects that need fixing, and that’s work that has to be done before I can send it anywhere–and even then the work won’t be done.

That’s the thing about writing books: You’re never done. Not really. You take a breath and then you’re shoved back into it again. One of the reasons why I was so set on finishing Harbinger this week is because I want to start the next thing (which I’m very excited about but am not ready to talk about yet). And there are other things after that–I have a wonderful/awful feeling that the next thing is actually the first of three things, and there are another couple of things that might come after L&O… and I guess finishing just isn’t enough for me anymore. Which feels kind of sad, even though I guess I should be mostly pleased about what it means.

So. On to the next one.