Monthly Archives: December 2013

The Year’s Best Science Fiction 31 ToC

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Today SF Signal released the table of contents for the 31st volume of The Year’s Best Science Fiction, and I don’t mind saying that I’m fairly omgomg about the company I’m in. Check this shit out:

  1. “The Discovered Country” by Ian R. MacLeod
  2. “The Book Seller” by Lavie Tidhar
  3. “Pathways” by Nancy Kress
  4. “A Heap of Broken Images” by Sunny Moraine
  5. “Rock of Ages” by Jay Lake
  6. “Rosary and Goldenstar” by Geoff Ryman
  7. “Gray Wings” by Karl Bunker
  8. The Best We Can” by Carrie Vaughn
  9. “Transitional Forms” by Paul McAuley
  10. “Precious Mental” by Robert Reed
  11. “Martian Blood” by Allen M. Steele
  12. “Zero For Conduct” by Greg Egan
  13. The Waiting Stars” by Aliette de Bodard
  14. A Map of Mercury” by Alastair Reynolds
  15. One” by Nancy Kress
  16. “Murder on the Aldrin Express” by Martin L. Shoemaker
  17. Biographical Fragments of the Life of Julian Prince” by Jake Kerr
  18. The Plague” by Ken Liu
  19. “Fleet” by Sandra McDonald
  20. “The She-Wolf’s Hidden Grin” by Michael Swanwick
  21. “Bad Day on Boscobel” by Alexander Jablokov
  22. The Irish Astronaut” by Val Nolan
  23. “The Other Gun” by Neal Asher
  24. “Only Human” by Lavie Tidhar
  25. “Entangled” by Ian R. MacLeod
  26. “Earth 1″ by Stephen Baxter
  27. “Technarion” by Sean McMullen
  28. “Finders” by Melissa Scott
  29. “The Queen of Night’s Aria” by Ian McDonald
  30. “Hard Stars” by Brendan DuBois
  31. The Promise of Space” by James Patrick Kelly
  32. “Quicken” by Damien Broderick

It’ll be out in hardcover and paperback in July. Can’t wait.

A poem for Advent

by Rob Wanenchak

Her First Calf

Her fate seizes her and brings her
down. She is heavy with it. It
wrings her. The great weight
is heaved out of her. It eases.
She moves into what she has become
sure in her fate now
as a fish free in the current.
She turns to the calf who has broken
out of the womb’s water and its veil.
He breathes. She licks his wet hair.
He gathers his legs under him
and rises. He stands, and his legs
wobble. After the months
of his pursuit of her now
they meet face to face.
From the beginnings of the world
his arrival and her welcome
have been prepared. They have always
known each other.

– Wendell Berry

Sunday Linkdump: A smile I’ve learned to fear

He's watching.

He’s watching.

So it’s been a while, hasn’t it? Stuffing some news in with the links.

To my immense chuffedness, Line and Orbit took silver in the Best Gay SF and bronze in the Best Gay Debut categories in the 2013 Rainbow Awards. Many, many congrats to all the winners and finalists.

Linky links.

  • “Michigan passes ‘rape insurance’ bill”. The Republican governor actually opposed it. Michigan, I cannot even with you.
  • “The Return of the Welfare Queen”. Which does not actually exist, naturally.

    The facts defy the stereotypes. The largest group of food-stamp recipients is white; 45 percent of all beneficiaries are children; and most people eligible for Medicaid are families with children in which at least one person in the household has a job.

  • “David Cronenberg Wants to Be Inside You.” On the Cronenberg exhibition currently making the rounds and Cronenberg’s overall oeuvre.
  • “Friday the 13th: A Ghost Story”. This past Friday was the 13th. So someone had a surprising and unwelcome visitor.
  • “Five Stages of Reading the Novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture”.

    The book starts with a special preface by Admiral Kirk. He introduces himself by talking about his name. Kirk, because he’s a traditionalist, Tiberius because of his grandfather’s fascination with the classics, and James after his uncle and his mother’s first love instructor.

    Yeah. That’s what it said. That’s page one.

  • Over at Cyborgology, David Banks has the first part of a post series we’re doing, of our own personal history with devices and digital technology. As I said on Twitter, it’s funny, insightful, and rather sweet.
  • And I have the first part of a two-part essay on sex and drones and how they go together.

    Drones have become a symbol of contemporary surveillance, a thing that’s always there and always watching and always potentially capable of doing harm. Sometimes this harm is through direct violence, and sometimes it’s merely the delivery of data to people who can use it against you. But either way, there are two aspects to the erotic power of drones, and they’re interrelated: Being known, and being controlled.

This has become my theme/end titles music for Labyrinthian, the SF novel I just finished writing, so enjoy.